ELD Mandate

Navigating the Impacts of the ELD Mandate on the Trucking Industry

The implementation of the Electronic Logging Device (ELD) Mandate has brought significant changes to the trucking industry. This article explores the impacts of the ELD Mandate, focusing on its implementation in the United States. Additionally, it compares the ELD regulations between the United States and Canada, highlighting differences in hours of service (HOS) regulations, technical specifications, device certification, and data transfer requirements. 

Furthermore, it delves into the compliance and enforcement procedures established by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) in the United States, along with the penalties for non-compliance.

Overview of the ELD Mandate Rollout in the United States:

The ELD Mandate, introduced by the FMCSA, requires commercial motor vehicle operators to use electronic logging devices to track and record their hours of service. This section provides an overview of the ELD Mandate’s implementation process, including key milestones and the timeline for compliance.

Comparison of Canadian and American ELD Mandate Regulations:

While the United States and Canada share similarities in their trucking industries, there are notable differences in their ELD regulations. This section explores the variations between the two countries, focusing on HOS regulations, technical specifications, device certification, and data transfer and storage requirements. By understanding these distinctions, trucking companies can navigate cross-border operations more effectively.

Differences in Hours of Service (HOS) Regulations:

The ELD Mandate has specific rules regarding drivers’ working hours and rest periods. This subsection highlights the differences in HOS regulations between the United States and Canada, such as maximum driving hours, mandatory break periods, and off-duty requirements.

Variations in Technical Specifications and Device Certification:

ELDs need to meet certain technical specifications and be certified for compliance. This subsection examines the divergences in technical requirements and certification processes for ELDs in the United States and Canada, considering factors like data accuracy, synchronization, and device compatibility.

Distinct Data Transfer and Storage Requirements:

The transfer and storage of electronic logs are crucial aspects of the ELD Mandate. This subsection explores the contrasting data transfer methods and storage requirements in the United States and Canada. It discusses the accepted formats for data transfer, retention periods, and accessibility for authorized personnel.

ELD Mandate Compliance and Enforcement Procedures in the United States:

Ensuring compliance with the ELD Mandate is essential for trucking companies operating in the United States. This section outlines the guidelines established by the FMCSA to ensure adherence to ELD regulations and mitigate non-compliance risks.

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Guidelines:

The FMCSA has provided guidelines and resources to assist motor carriers and drivers in complying with the ELD Mandate. This subsection highlights the key guidelines and recommendations, including the proper use of ELDs, training requirements, and recordkeeping obligations.

ELD Mandate Penalties for Non-compliance:

Non-compliance with the ELD Mandate can result in penalties and sanctions. This subsection explores the potential consequences of non-compliance, such as fines, out-of-service orders, and negative safety ratings. It also discusses strategies to avoid penalties and maintain compliance.

The ELD Mandate has significantly impacted the trucking industry, particularly in the United States. By understanding the ELD regulations, differences between the United States and Canada, and compliance and enforcement procedures, trucking companies can adapt to the changes effectively, ensure regulatory compliance, and optimize their operations in an increasingly digitized environment.

Exemptions, Benefits, and Impacts on the Trucking Industry

The ELD Mandate has reshaped the trucking industry by introducing electronic logging devices (ELDs) to track and record hours of service (HOS). This article explores two key aspects of the ELD Mandate: exemptions and exceptions to the mandate, and the benefits it brings to the industry. Additionally, it examines the profound impacts of the ELD Mandate, ranging from improved road safety and enhanced driver health to streamlined operations and increased productivity.

I. Exemptions and Exceptions to the Mandate:

While the ELD Mandate applies to most commercial motor vehicle operators, there are specific exemptions and exceptions that warrant consideration. This section delves into the various categories of exemptions and exceptions, providing insights into situations where certain vehicles or drivers may be exempt from using ELDs.

A. Exemptions:

  1. Short-haul Exemption: This subsection explores the exemption for drivers operating within a 150 air-mile radius and who meet specific criteria regarding duration and frequency of their operations.
  2. Driveaway-Towaway Exemption: This subsection explains the exemption for drivers involved in the transport of vehicles where the truck being driven is the commodity being delivered.
  3. Pre-2000 Model Year Exemption: This subsection discusses the exemption for commercial motor vehicles with engine model years predating 2000.

B. Exceptions:

  1. Personal Conveyance Exception: This subsection delves into the personal conveyance exception, which allows drivers to operate their commercial vehicles for personal purposes without it counting against their HOS limits.
  2. Yard Move Exception: This subsection explores the yard move exception, which permits drivers to move their vehicles on private property for short distances without switching to on-duty status.

II. Benefits of the ELD Mandate:

The ELD Mandate brings forth a range of benefits for the trucking industry, positively impacting various aspects. This section highlights the advantages that arise from the implementation of ELDs.

A. Improved Road Safety and Reduced Accidents:

By accurately tracking and monitoring HOS, ELDs contribute to enhanced road safety. This subsection explores how ELDs help prevent driver fatigue, reduce instances of HOS violations, and improve compliance with road safety regulations.

B. Enhanced Driver Health and Well-being:

ELDs play a crucial role in promoting the health and well-being of drivers. This subsection discusses how ELDs contribute to better work-life balance, more predictable schedules, reduced stress, and improved overall driver health.

C. Streamlined Operations and Increased Productivity:

The implementation of ELDs leads to streamlined operations and increased productivity for trucking companies. This subsection explores how ELDs facilitate efficient dispatching, accurate tracking of vehicle locations, automated recordkeeping, and improved communication between drivers and fleet managers.

The ELD Mandate has transformed the trucking industry, bringing exemptions and exceptions to accommodate specific scenarios. Additionally, it offers numerous benefits, including improved road safety, enhanced driver health and well-being, and streamlined operations leading to increased productivity. By understanding these exemptions, exceptions, and benefits, trucking companies can navigate the ELD Mandate effectively, capitalize on its advantages, and foster a safer and more efficient industry landscape.

Revisions To FMCSA Federal Hours Of Service Rules

In the recent weeks the trucking industry has been praised for being a key component to the economy. As it employs over seven million people and moves approximately 70% of the nation’s domestic freight, many have found that during an unprecedented time, it was truly an essential industry. With this being said, to help allow the commercial transportation to keep moving some modifications to regulations and rules have been made. 

 

Hours Of Service Modifications 

On May 14, 2020, the FMCSA announced that there would be upcoming changes to the Federal Hours of Service Rules for commercial driving. Such updates are expected to modernize the HOS regulations and provide the U.S. economy as well as American consumers an estimated $274 million in annualized savings. The revisions were previously discussed and reviewed by the FMCSA in August of 2019. Below are the four main revisions. 

  • Adjustments for the 30-minute break rule so safety and flexibility can improve
    • After 8 hours of consecutive driving, a driver is able to use their required break as being on-duty but not driving rather than being off-duty
  • Drivers will be able to split their required 10 hours off-duty into two periods (either an 8/2 split or 7/3 split) with a sleeper-berth exception 
    • Neither split will count against the driver’s 14 hour driving window 
  • The maximum window of when driving is permitted will be modified to extend by two hours
  • For certain commercial drivers, the short-haul exception will change by lengthening the drivers’ maximum on-duty period to 14 hours (from 12 hours) and extend the distance limit to 150 air miles (from 100 air miles)

 

It is important to note that the removal of a key point of the 30 minute to 3 hour pause to the work day from The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) is not part of the Final Rule.

These modifications will go into effect on September 29, 2020. 

For more information about these modifications and other news or regulations pertaining to the commercial transportation industry, visit: FMCSA’s Website

 

How The Commercial Transportation Industry Will Be Affected 

Since there is more focus to ensure that drivers are having adequate sleep and rest while they are on the road to reduce fatigue related road incidents, fleet managers can’t risk falling behind on ever-changing rules. When discussing these new changes, it’s important for commercial drivers to understand how their fleet technology may be impacted. 

 

Rulesets For Electronic Logging Devices 

For those using Geotab Drive ELD’s, Geotab has noted their commitment to following ANPRM and NPRM processes with Partners and associations. Meaning they are making relevant changes to the device rulesets in time for it to be used by the official effective date (September 29, 2020). As a long time partner of Geotab, we can ensure that our customers who use these devices have nothing to worry about and should keep their eyes open for further communication about device ruleset updates! 

 

Interested to learn more about how your fleet can better abide to strict regulations, save hundreds of dollars or even improve the driving conditions of your team? Contact us today! Regardless of your needs, we have consultants who specializes in every aspect of your fleet who can help! 

How Commercial Transportation Is Impacted By COVID-19

In recent news, not only has the medical community been affected by the outbreak of coronavirus, but the global supply chain as well. On March 11, the World Health Organization declared the recent outbreak of COVID-19 as a pandemic due to its sudden and concerning spread. In order to combat the spread of the virus, the public has been told to practice social distancing and many businesses have even been told to close their doors. However, it’s important to note that these are not the only changes that are happening as a result of the outbreak. In fact, the commercial transportation sector is finding that the public’s new way of living (as a result of being impacted by COVID-19) is also changing their operations. 

 

Below we discuss an overview of how the transportation industry is affected by leveraging fleet data provided by Geotab via intelligent solutions. Please note that the data was gathered on April 10, 2020, via their blog

 

How The World Is Impacted By COVID-19

 

With coronavirus infection numbers growing, there have been numerous efforts put into place to limit the spreading of the virus. One effort, the closing of numerous borders, may have affected travel, but not commercial transportation. Borders still remain open for those transporting goods because of the increased need of supplies and equipment in wake of the city lockdowns, community social distancing and more. 

 

Initial Changes In Commercial Transportation 

 

When discussing how essential the transportation sector is, as they are still able to travel across borders for deliveries, it’s important to highlight how there has even been movements towards making transporting essential cargo easier. Specifically the Emergency Declaration issued by the FMCSA and the Essential Freight Transport Exemption which was put into effect by Transport Canada. Both of which focus on adjusting the hours of service (HOS) regulation that drivers within the transportation sector must abide to. These changes allow drivers to drive over the maximum HOS in their country (meaning strict HOS regulations have been changed as a result of COVID-19). However, even though transportation seems more important than ever as they provide relief to communities needing essential supplies, it’s important to look at how the volume of commercial transportation vehicles may be changing. Specifically how the volume (which includes the number of trips and the amount of fuel used) has changed since the month of February.

 

Affected Volume In Activity 

 

As one can imagine, there are countless changes happening to various industries. But when speaking to transportation, a decrease in commercial vehicle activity has been noted. Analyzing data that was collected from Geotab (from the dates March 15 to April 10), a noticeable decrease can be noticed in the percent of normal activity. With a baseline starting before March 15, continuing to April 10 – the time when many countries and industries started to be greatly impacted by COVID-19. Below is a graph which depicts the longitudinal view of commercial traffic volume that is being discussed. Specifically measuring the number of trips relative to normal activity, as well as the type of vehicle used. 

Source: Geotab; The impact of COVID-19 on commercial transportation and trade activit

 

As illustrated on the graph, various vehicles including heavy-duty trucks (HDT), medium-duty trucks (MDT), light-duty trucks (LDT), multi-purpose vehicles (MPV), as well as cars declined over time in regards to the amount of activity tracked. 

 

This decline is visible in a heatmap provided by Geotab when looking at data in regards to operating percentages and locations (micro regions in the U.S. and Canada). The chart compares what the normal operations percentage was in February 2020, to currently, in April 2020. 

Source: Geotab; The impact of COVID-19 on commercial transportation and trade activity

Source: Geotab; The impact of COVID-19 on commercial transportation and trade activit

 

In terms of Canadian changes, when looking at data from most recent weeks, compared to data from February 1 to March 15, Canada appears to be operating at 74% of normal commercial transportation activity. It’s important to note that the Maritimes is operating at the lowest when compared to normal – 67%. In comparison, the U.S. has also felt a large impact. The U.S. is operating at an average of 75% of normal commercial transportation activity. Reporting that the State of New York and New Jersey are the most impacted. They are only operating at 55% of normal activity. 

 

In brief, some other changes to highlight are; 

  • Ontario operating at 76% in comparison to 97%
  • Quebec operating at 68% in comparison to 99%
  • The West (US) operating at 68% in comparison to 100%
  • The Mid-Atlantic (US) operating at 74% in comparison to 100% 
  • The Midwest (US) operating at 76% in comparison to 98%  

 

Affected Fuel Usage 

 

With countless vehicles contributing to the commercial transportation sector, it’s also important to look at how these vehicles and usage are changing in terms of fuel during this time. Specifically looking at how fuel usage may be impacted by COVID-19 through decreasing commercial transport activity. 

Source: Geotab; The impact of COVID-19 on commercial transportation and trade activity 

 

The graph depicts that at the start of March 2020, there was a steady quantity of fuel being used among commercial vehicles. The data focused on vehicles that included buses, HDT, LDT, MDT, MPV, and passenger. A general decrease started on March 15, and continued until March 26. Since the end of March, the use of fuel in most cases did not recover to quantities previous to COVID-19, but is occasionally going through dips.

 

It is important to note that decrease was not as apparent within the trucking economy. Some may assume this is because while some operations may have changed, many commercial vehicles are still essential to transport supplies and equipment during this time. When reviewing the data of how the fuel usage of buses and passenger vehicles has dropped greatly, many assume it is because those vehicles are typically not operating at a high frequency due to health and safety recommendations. This includes how the public has been told to work from home (so there are less commuters) as well how the public is told to socially distance themselves from each other and stop public gatherings or events (so there is less travelling for leisure purposes).  

 

During This Change, Safety Is Critical 

 

With commercial transportation still remaining steady (with only minor dips) in terms of fuel use and volume, it’s safe to say that the industry is still steady. What this means is that even at a time where so much is in flux, the transportation sector is critical for many communities as they can provide essential supplies among other necessities.  

 

However, with so much uncertainty surrounding coronavirus and how businesses are impacted by COVID-19 in terms of safety and the length of the pandemic, it’s important for those who are on the frontlines to do what they can to stay safe. One way when speaking to the transportation sector, is for drivers and other delivery personnel to monitor for potential symptoms. Proactively monitoring for coughs, fevers and other signs of viruses can help reduce the possible and unknowing spread of the virus. Especially when speaking about individuals who are travelling constantly and moving cargo. Tools like ZenduCheck, a digital symptom monitoring app, allows drivers and other essential personnel to monitor their health. To learn more about how symptom monitoring can be useful in promoting safety in fleets, click on the button below. 

Questions To Ask Before Buying ELD Solutions

As the deadline to be ELD compliant is looming closer (or as already passed), it’s important that every fleet manager researches what electronic logging device will work best for them. As many fleets could still be operating without such devices, it’s only a matter of time before drivers are asked to show hours of service without using paperlogs. Prior to discussing the important questions that fleet managers should ask when buying ELD solutions, it’s important to understand how buying the right (or wrong) device could affect your fleet and why you need to be ELD compliant. 

 

What Is The ELD Mandate?

 

The ELD Mandate is a regulation which focuses on the amount of travelling a commercial motor vehicle operator has and can complete. Specifically, it focuses on limiting the amount of driving to a pre-set and pre-determined ‘safe duration’ to ensure that drivers are not overworking themselves to complete more deliveries or routes. This stems from the concern that more driving incidents, accidents or poor judgement calls typically happen when drivers behind the wheel are tired because they have not had enough rest on the clock or between shifts. In order to complete this, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) and the Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA) began to move towards electronic devices (ELDs). ELDs are devices which record the driving time and hours-of-service (HOS) of a driver via telematics and IoT innovation. This is possible as the device typically has a plug-and-play feature which allows it to be installed into nearly any vehicle to immediately start to monitor the engine and whether it is running. However, as every fleet is different, it’s important to perform your own research in regards to your specific fleet size and location with up-to-date information to ensure that you are compliant at all times. 

What Are The Deadlines? 

 

In America, most fleets were required to make the switch in December 2017. However, American transport companies that were utilizing automatic onboard recording devices (AOBRDs) prior to December 2017, were provided with a different compliance date of December 2019. Canada on the other hand, is required to be ELD compliant by June 2021

 

What Benefits Can Fleets Expect To Notice After Becoming Compliant? 

 

Apart from being compliant and limiting the fines or penalties could receive, it’s important to learn about the additional benefits that come from being ELD compliant. In some cases, fleet managers may find that they are not only able to better organize their efforts, but can see financial improvements happen. The following are some benefits that managers can expect to notice once their fleet is ELD compliant: 

 

  • Increased accuracy with administrative tasks as the devices automatically record and log information
  • Improved fuel use as idling can be monitored and addressed
  • Better vehicle diagnostics as engine fault codes can be detected quickly with ease 
  • Improved location tracking of assets and route management as ELDs automatically gather information about where the device is 
  • Improved identification of poor driving behaviours for each driver (that can later be addressed in training modules or employee reviews)
  • Increased safety as there is less of a risk of drivers operating the motor vehicle if they are overworked and tired 
  • Improved Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) scores as the device can help ensure that you are meeting strict standards 

 

Interested in viewing what electronic logging devices GoFleet can offer you? 

shop, devices, button, eld

However, with so many options to look at and so many details to review, we understand that sometimes becoming ELD compliant can be overwhelming. That’s why we compiled a list of questions that should be asked when inquiring about ELD Solutions

 

Read our top 7 questions to keep in mind before buying ELD solutions below! 

 

1. “Will the same device work in any type of vehicle?”

 

When you’re speaking with a solutions provider or buying ELD solutions, it’s important that you discuss in-depth your current needs and how your fleet could change (or how you would like it to change) in the future. Specifically, mentioning information like what class of vehicles are or will be used (ie. makes, models and fuel type), the size of your fleet, and your current struggles of fleet management in relation to driver and workload monitoring. 

 

All of this information can better help your ELD provider supply devices that are compatible now and in the future. 

 

2. “What is the installation procedure for ELD solutions and how long does it take?”

 

To fully understand the installation process, it’s important that you inquire not only about how easy the ELD solutions will be to install, but what the failure rates are in addition to the simplicity of troubleshooting or replacing. For example, if a device has a high failure rate or is difficult to replace due to rarity, it may not be the right fit for a small-sized fleet that needs to be agile and functional at all times.

 

3. “How much does the device cost and what are the ongoing fees?”

 

Often, the go-ahead to deploy new technology typically relies on the financial burden that the company will take on. So always inquire twice about this. Asking not only at the beginning of your research, but finalizing the cost and fees at the end (right before you purchase the devices). This will ensure that there are no surprises. 

 

Somethings to remember to consider while asking about the cost are:

  • How expensive the hardware itself is
  • Whether you will require professional installation or if it is a plug-and-play device
  • What the monthly recurring charge (MRC) is for each vehicle 
  • What is the training or onboarding process typically like – taking into consideration downtime to install devices or train personnel 

 

4. “Is the ELD device easy to use?”

 

GO9 GPS Tracking DeviceIf a device is too complex or difficult to understand, you may find that it’s not the right fit for your team. As you need to ensure that your entire team, especially your drivers, will understand how to use it – you need to be confident in the capabilities of the device. Ensuring the device is user-friendly, easy to setup and requires minimum upkeep are only a few things to keep in mind. 

 

Additionally, prior to buying ELD solutions, you should consider how the device will be supported. For example, asking whether it is supported with iOS and Android devices, or whether you will need to purchase specific devices to use it. For many fleet managers, cross-compatibility with adaptable ELD solutions are the most attractive. 

 

5. “How will you ensure that the solution will remain compliant in the future?”

 

Since a major factor of the adoption of electronic logging devices are compliance requirements, it’s important that the device you adopt will always remain compliant. Specifically inquiring whether the solution will adapt to new regulations and whether you are satisfied with the vendor’s commitment to updating their device. 

 

6. “What types of plans do you offer? How easy is it to switch?”

 

Depending on the current needs of your fleet, certain plans will be better for you. With this being said typically, there is a Base Plan that has basic GPS tracking features, a Regulatory Plan with improved data tracking, a Pro Plan that tracks engine data, and a ProPlus Plan that does all of this with 24/7 support! While it is fairly easy to upgrade in most cases, it’s important to not only clarify this but understand all features available. 

 

Some key features to keep in mind are: 

  • Support for ruleset and exemptions 
  • The ability to share data with 3rd party users or backend customers
  • Open platform expandability and data ownership

 

7. “How long has your company been in business? Have you offered an AOBRD product before?”

 

Working with a business that is well known and experienced in the industry is critical. While some newer organizations may have an attractive price, you may find that in the future they are unable to provide the right offerings and support because of their young age. With this being said, always research and look for reviews with who you are working with so you don’t unknowingly work with a less than a reputable provider. You can also inquire about their core business offerings, how long they’ve been supporting your industry, how long they have been offering ELDs, how large their customer base is and the names of businesses they work with who are similar to yours. 

eld mandate deadline

Even though we only listed the seven important questions, there could be additional concerns that you need to address before buying ELD solutions. With that being said, we invite you to give us a call to talk about your fleet and your unique ELD needs. We’re confident that with our extensive knowledge of electronic logging devices, we have the experience necessary to help!

Remember while many Canadian fleets still have some time to migrate to using electronic logging devices, many American fleets should already be compliant! 

 

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HOS Relief Amid COVID-19 Outbreak

As the concern of the COVID-19 outbreak continues to worsen, many are looking at how businesses can be provided with additional relief during this time. While there are initiatives in place to help small businesses who had to close their doors to practice social distancing and slow the spread, there is additional aid that focuses on the demand for essential supplies. Specifically, focusing on increasing the amount of supplies and equipment transported daily by waiving hours-of-service (HOS) regulations. 

 

Below are updates in both Canada and the United States: 

 

HOS in the United States 

 

Earlier this month, on March 13, it was announced that the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) will adjust the HOS regulations. They will help those in the US transportation sector provide more assistance to relief efforts of the virus. Until April 12, 2020, or when the COVID-19 emergency is terminated, a FMCSA Emergency Declaration has been issued and will be in place nation-wide to suspend the hours-of-service regulations for drivers. 

 

Prior to adjusting any processes within your fleet, make sure you familiarize yourself and your team with the Emergency Declaration as the FMCSA has specific criteria on what will allow a carrier to be eligible. 

 

Find the Declaration here: Emergency Declaration

 

HOS in Canada 

 

Similarly, Transport Canada has issued an exception to help provide COVID-19 relief to Canadian truck drivers moving essential supplies. Again, drivers who meet specific criteria will be exempt from hours-of-services requirements when carriers who are federally regulated give advance notice with specific information regarding which vehicles will be partaking in it. This waiver will be in effect from March 24, until April 30, 2020. 

 

Again, prior to implementing any new initiatives related to HOS, it is recommended that you familiarize yourself and your team with the Essential Freight Transport Exemption. As there is specific criteria that must be met prior to being safely exempt, understanding the exemption in-full is critical. 

 

Find the Exemption here: Essential Freight Transport Exemption

 

As information and plans are in constant flux during this time, we always recommend for businesses and fleet drivers to stay up-to-date with ongoing news and regulations. This will ensure that compliance is always met and teams are working efficiently. 

 

Additional Resources To Follow: 

Truckload Carriers Association: https://www.truckload.org/resources-for-covid-19/#1585236782225-d159424f-afd2

Canadian Trucking Alliance: http://cantruck.ca/covid-19/

What Happens If You’re Not ELD Compliant

December 16th, 2019 is an important date for many commercial fleet organizations as it marks the day that commercial drivers are required to install and fully understand how to use ELDs within their vehicles, unless an AOBRD was in use prior to December 18, 2017. But, if an automatic onboarding recording device was in use prior to December 18, 2017, drivers will have an extended deadline of June 21, 2021, to become ELD compliant. 

While there was a soft enforcement period which graced drivers with not having ELD violations affect their CSA scores, full enforcement will be in effect shortly. 

What Being ELD Compliant Means 

Being ELD compliant means that a commercial fleet which meets the criteria in relation to the ELD mandate must have the ELD recording device. As well, it’s worth noting that the electronic logging device must be self-certified, and in Canada, the devices must be third-party certified. Meaning, work-rest cycles will be obeyed as service compliance and fatigue management is at the core of this. 

Apart from having the proper device, being ELD compliant also means that the drivers who are operating commercial motor vehicles must also know how to use the device. Specifically, how to provide authorized safety officials supporting documents or information regarding their travels. 

“As an industry we are committed to improving road safety. Today’s announcement is a big step in the right direction and initiates the countdown toward the elimination of paper logbooks as a legal compliance option. The Canadian introduction of third-party certification of ELD devices will also ensure that the non-compliant operators in our sector cannot find workarounds to hours of service compliance in an electronic monitoring environment.”

–David Carruth, Chairperson, Ontario Trucking Association.

Common Violations 

As the deadline to be compliant with electronic logging devices quickly approaches, it’s critical to understand that the regulation will be strictly enforced. Among the many infractions a driver could receive, below are the four most common, and possibility the most detrimental to drivers or fleets. 

Affect CSA Score 

For carriers, the Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) program helps to hold motorists accountable for their role in road safety. The program looks to monitor unsafe driving, vehicle maintenance as well as driver fitness with hopes to encourage fleets to operate in a safe manner. While there are many factors that make up your CSA score, it’s important to remember that once ELD compliance is in effect, failing to meet standards can lower your score. With severity ranging depending on the ELD infraction, fleets can’t risk it as low CSA scores can result in more roadside inspections as well as interfere with best-paying load or good business opportunities. Additionally, depending on the violation, drivers may be placed out-of-service until they are compliant. 

Some violations that are known to typically be weighted more heavily in terms of severity are listed below;

  • No record of duty status 
  • Using an incomplete or wrong method to record HOS (Hours Of Service) 
  • ELD screen unable to be viewed from outside of the vehicle 
  • Using a device that is not registered with the FMCSA (Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration)

Out Of Service 

If a driver is found to not have the proper ELD device for their commercial vehicle, it is possible, and likely that they will be placed out-of-service for at least 10 hours based on OOSC (Out-Of-Service criteria). While this typically occurs if a driver creates false reports or uses unauthorized ELD or ABORDs, being OOS can be detrimental. Not only are drivers unable to work for a lengthy period of time, or until they are compliant, but being out-of-service directly correlates to lost revenue as no work is completed. 

Penalties fines 

As one can assume, violations will have penalties and fines associated with them. Depending on the severity of the violation, the fine received can be thousands of dollars, translating into wasted finances that could be used to better the fleet. On average, the North American Trucking Association found that the average fine associated with failure to comply was $2,867, with the highest recorded fine being $13,680. 

Towing costs 

In addition to penalties and fines, fleets can see additional expenses adding up if they are not ELD compliant. One major expense to highlight is the cost of towing non-exempt vehicles if the driver is placed out-of-service. Depending on the location of the vehicle, the tow can cost hundreds. 

With the repercussions of not being ELD compliant looming over some fleets, it’s crucial for businesses to begin anticipating their transition to the new device. As discussed, overlooking such an important change can greatly impact the success of the fleet. 

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With the deadline for ELD compliancy quickly approaching, be sure to take advantage of our GoFleet Promotion that can save you hundreds today!